Links and Things to Read

Or things I’ve read recently and want to pass along. First, Mark Simon of ESPN explains why Jon Niese may have a better year in 2012:

Something jumped out at us when we looked at that, along with some hit-location charts for all the fly balls and pop ups Niese allowed.

The average pitcher allows hits on about 10 to 12 percent of soft/normally hit fly balls and pop ups.

Niese’s rate last year? A whopping 27 percent.

That led to his batting average on balls in play (BABIP) being among the highest in the majors — .333.

– Mark Simon, “What’s Next for Jonathon Niese?”
ESPN New York

If you’re optimistic about Niese, then hang your hat on this. (Note: I don’t hang my hats anywhere. They sit on my desk.) On the other hand, as Simon also points out, Niese has always given up an enormous number of hits, even in the minor leagues. So maybe he just gives up a ton of hits. This coming season should be a tipping point for Niese, with regards to whether his high batting averages against are the result of bad luck or just a lack of skill.

Hey, let’s talk about money for a second:

Noreen Harrington, a 20-year hedge-fund executive and former Goldman Sachs and Merrill Lynch employee who was trying to match the returns of the Madoff funds, quit her job as chief investment officer of Wilpon-owned Sterling Stamos in protest in 2003. That came after the Wilpon-owned funds placed money with a Madoff feeder fund over her strenuous objections, the trustee suing the Wilpons for $386 million claims.

– Adam Rubin, “Filing: Wilpons Were Alerted to Returns”
ESPN-New York

At this point, most Mets fans seem to be rooting against the Wilpons retaining control of the team. So here are my three questions for Mets fans:

– Which is better for the New York Mets — the baseball team that actually plays baseball games — over the next five years: Ownership retaining control of the Mets — this is presumably a slow, messy process — or Ownership selling the team — again, a slow, messy process?

– If you are rooting against the current ownership group, why? Is it because you think that someone else owning the Mets will ultimately be better for the team, and you’d like to see that outcome? Or it is because you want ownership to lose something they seem to enjoy, because that seems fair (and it seems fair either because so many other people lost things with Madoff, serious financial things and money and the likes, and anyone who benefited should also lose something; or because you blame ownership for taking away something you enjoyed, i.e., a good Mets team or a certain star shortstop, so that they can hold on to the things they enjoy)?

– Is anyone just rooting for a knockout punch either way? Either the team is sold quickly or the financial situation clears up quickly, just so long as it’s over.

Real questions. I don’t have a solid answer for any of them, but I’d like to hear some fan voices.

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7 Comments

Filed under Mets, Words

7 responses to “Links and Things to Read

  1. AV

    I’m with option #3: “- Is anyone just rooting for a knockout punch either way? Either the team is sold quickly or the financial situation clears up quickly, just so long as it’s over.”

    Let’s get focused on baseball again. This is holding everything up with the team.

    Besides, I recall Yankee fans in the 1990’s chanting “George Must Go”, only to welcome Steinbrenner back with open arms from his MLB suspension at roughly the same time the Jeter-Rivera-Posada-Williams prospect class began to arrive (as if he had something to do with it.)

    • Its an awkward analogy to make, but we could see some similarity to the Mets being forced to hold onto and rely on their young players to shed payroll, to the Yankees development of its dynasty core while George was not allowed to obstruct with the operations and trade every prospect for an ageing pending free agent.

      Maybe we get so lucky as to hang onto the prospects that become our next stars.

  2. These things never happen quickly, and what we have a a number of equally awful options. None of them go well for the Mets fan in the end.

    If any single thing is affected by the fences being moved in it will be that fly ball hit rate for Niese. Not more homers for Bay or Wright, or more homers allowed by Pelfrey and Dickey… but all the dinkers and dunkers that fell in around the OF last year is what should see some decline.

  3. I’m hoping Fred’s playing Power Ball..and hits.

    I don’t care who owns the team, and didn’t care about any of this stuff until payroll gradually shrunk, little by little, until Reyes didn’t fit anymore.

    I’m angry about that, and it’s easy to blame the Wilpons, but revenge doesn’t solve anything. I just want whatever the quickest resolution is, and it still seems to me like that’s the Wilpons staying, but maybe not.

  4. I want the Wilpons gone, because I think they’re bad owners. I was the only person I know who was hoping Doubleday would buy out the Wilpons, rather than the historical reverse. (For those of you with short memories, there was general rejoicing when the Wilpons bought out Doubleday, who was widely regarded as the reason the Mets hadn’t won a WS since 1986, Doubleday not being as willing to spend the money.)

    As for how fast this should play out, I was hoping, really without hope, for a quick resolution… before Selig re-upped as commissioner. Now I’d just as soon the mess drag out, in the hopes Selig won’t be around to interfere with the process when the time comes.

  5. I think our team is going to be terrible. And the Wilpons should leave immediately. You are probably rooting for keeping the Wilpons.

  6. I don’t really care who ownes the team. What I do care about is when the Mets can spend money again they still have someone like Sandy Alderson or Paul Depodesta deciding who to spend it on. If the Wilpons are at fault for anything its for putting people like Omar Minaya (or any of the other shitty GMs the Mets had) in charge.

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